Access Points

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Regular Contributor I
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎10-05-2011

Auto AP detection on floor map?

I've taken a couple Aruba online courses. One showed a way to automatically detect APs on a floor map using triangulation.

We use Airwave and we have our floor maps loaded, but the APs are still manually set on the floor map. Is there a way to have this automatic AP detection and insertion onto the floor map?

Thanks.
Aruba Employee
Posts: 455
Registered: ‎04-02-2007

Re: Auto AP detection on floor map?

I think you're thinking of triangulation of rogue APs, there is no way for the system to figure out where the APs are in relation to each other. In the planning stage the tool will suggest AP placements, but you need to confirm that the correct AP is in the correct place when installed. After that we can triangulate the location of devices.

-awl
Andy Logan, ACDX
Director, Strategic Account Solutions
Aruba Networks
Regular Contributor I
Posts: 177
Registered: ‎10-05-2011

Re: Auto AP detection on floor map?

I think I was confused with the planning stage where the APs can be automatically be set on a floor plan. Why isn't it possible to automatically find APs that are installed on the floor plan if Roque APs can be found that way? For a big company that has many APs managing them and keeping track of them I would think it's difficult.
Aruba Employee
Posts: 455
Registered: ‎04-02-2007

Re: Auto AP detection on floor map?

Let me try to explain why you have to do this and why it's really not that much trouble.

Rouge APs, or any device location, is based on triangulation. Triangulation requires that devices in known fixed locations hear the device. You can read a high level primer at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulation.

Each AP hears the other APs that are near it, and each is on a map in a fixed location. This gives us an information base to work with, because we know where some transmitters are, the power they are using, and the signal strength we receive at the other APs. Based on the signal strength that is heard from the device we want to locate, and what we know about the other APs signal strength and their location, we then triangulate the location of the device.

We can't put APs automatically on the map because there is no way to figure that out automatically. RF is affected by the paths it travels through the network. Things like lead in walls will stop signal. In some cases I may hear an AP that is farther away than one that is closer because of obstructions between the near AP, or advantageous multipath to the far AP. We will also hear APs on other floors, which will lead to more confusion.

Manually placing them on the map is the only way to get accurate information. This is not a challenge even in large enterprises due to two factors: AP installation and length of deployment.

When I'm installing APs I'm paying wiring and installation contractors to put the APs I purchased up. I know they are going up, when, and in what building / floor. When the contractos are installing them they simply record the MAC of the AP on the map where they installed it. The APs even have a handy sticker for this purpose. You don't typically go and deploy thousands of APs at a time. The project is broken down into manageable chunks, and if I deploy the APs on the map as I provision them it's not much trouble at all.

The other factor is that once an AP is up, it tends to stay up for between 3-7 years, sometimes as long as 10. These aren't things people move without a good reason because it costs money to have the installers come back and move things again. This eliminates you having to track resources after the initial install unless you have an AP failure.

Hopefully that clears it up,
-awl
Andy Logan, ACDX
Director, Strategic Account Solutions
Aruba Networks
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