Access Points

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Occasional Contributor II

Mixed a/b/g/n enviroment

We are planing to increase coverage in some of our academic buildings. Currently
we have about 20 mix of AP 65's and 70's in those buildings..We plan on installing
another 20 AP 105's
Is there a down side with having the limited N coverage?
Is it a waist of AP 105's?
Brian
Aruba Employee

Re: Mixed a/b/g/n enviroment

I think the only downside is that the speed in the area covered by the 105s will be higher, and students may notice a slow down when roaming to the a/b/g APs. Depending on how you are deploying the additional APs, you may want to put the 105s in a cluster so that the higher speed APs are in a lounge or group meeting area where large numbers of users will gather. Other than that, I would recommend going with 11n APs for all new deployments.

-awl
Andy Logan, ACDX
Director, Strategic Account Solutions
Aruba Networks
Occasional Contributor II

Re: Mixed a/b/g/n enviroment

Thanks for the quick reply Andy..I thought of taking the AP 65/70's from building
A and installing them in building B and the put all AP 105's into building A..Of course
cost of relocating them from one building to another could be a factor...In your opinion do you think it would be worth the extra effort provided the cost is not
to much?
Brian
Aruba Employee

Re: Mixed a/b/g/n enviroment

If you can afford it I would do it, you'll have a more consistent experience for users from building to building. Of course, you might start getting calls that building B is slow once people get used to 11n in building A :)

-awl
Andy Logan, ACDX
Director, Strategic Account Solutions
Aruba Networks
Frequent Contributor I

Re: Mixed a/b/g/n enviroment

To be honest, I dont even allow clients to get the "full" bandwidth on N as it is now, so you might want to just apply some bandwidth throttling in order to have a more consistent experience. If you want keep your Faculty with full bandwidth, and split the difference with your students - so the N building is still "faster" but not by much. Also make sure you have enough backbone in your distribution closets to handle the additional bandwidth on the edge. Otherwise you could have a couple APs really monopolizing your available LAN bandwidth.

-Dan
New Contributor

Re: Mixed a/b/g/n enviroment

You are aware that it is not advised to use the N standard in the 2.4 GHz band if you have more than one (1) AP?

See: https://airheads.arubanetworks.com/vBulletin/showthread.php?t=2259

We have tested N in the 2.4 GHz band and found it did not work well because of the the interference described in the article I mentioned above.

(You can use N in the 5 GHz band if you are carefull with the channels you allocate for it).

Gerrit Wiersma
Guru Elite

802.11n or "High Throughput"

Running 802.11n or high throughput is fine in the 2.4ghz band. It is only a problem if it is run with 40mhz, instead of 20 mhz channels in the 2.4. Fortunately, Aruba defaults to 20mhz channels in the 2.4ghz spectrum so you don't even have to think about that.


Colin Joseph
Aruba Customer Engineering

Looking for an Answer? Search the Community Knowledge Base Here: Community Knowledge Base

Occasional Contributor II

how to verify this

We've dropped a few AP125s out in our AP70 environment, I turned on
"High throughput enable (radio)" on my a and g radio profiles.

Can you tell me where to check and make sure I'm set properly for 2.4 / 5ghz and 20/40mhz settings?

Thanks!
Aruba

Checking 802.11n set-up

You can easily view the Channel usage under : Monitoring/Access points

20 MHz channels will be numbers (aligning to traditional a/b/g channel plans) e.g. 1,6,11, 36, 40

40 MHz channel usage will be denoted with the channel numbers with a "+" or a "-" suffix. e.g. 1+, 36+, 40-

You want to ensure you are using 40 MHz with the 5.0 GHz channels (e.g. the former 802.11a band) so look for the + or - and 20 MHz with the 2.4 GHz channels (e.g. the former 802.11b/g band), so no + or -.
Aruba

Checking 802.11n Client Usage

To view clients that are actually associating and communicating using 802.11n, you can check: Monitoring/Clients.

Look for the mode of association and the suffix "-HT" HT of course stands for high throughput and denotes a client connecting at "802.11n". Further the controller client list will show HT-20 and HT-40. These denote whether it's 20MHz 802.11n or 40 MHz 802.11n association.

So... at a glance you can see how many clients are 802.11a, b, g, 2.4n @ 20MHz, 5.0n @ 40MHz ;)
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