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[AirheadsConf LV 2013 Breakout] Wireless LAN- Gigabit Wi-Fi 802.11ac In-Depth

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Attached please find our presentation from [AirheadsConf LV 2013 Breakout] Wireless LAN - Gigabit Wi-Fi 802.11ac In-Depth.

 

This is the presentation we gave at Airheads Conference Las Vegas, March 2013. We welcome your feedback and discussion based on this presentation.

 

 

 

Abstract:
This session will survey the techniques used to make 802.11ac the fastest Wi-Fi yet. We will discuss how quickly products will advance along the roadmap, application and implementation ideas, and wrap-up with a brief survey of other work in the IEEE and Wi-Fi Alliance, including 60GHz Wi-Fi.

 

 

Watch a recorded livestream of this session from the conference here:

https://community.arubanetworks.com/t5/Community-Matters-Blog/Video-Gigabit-Wi-Fi-802-11ac-In-Depth-at-2013-Americas-Airheads/ba-p/68118

 

Presenter: Peter Thornycroft

 

Click on "Add a Comment" to leave a comment, ask the presenters a question, and ask the community a question.

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As you will have noticed, this talk was long on theory and short on practical advice.  This was by design - we don't yet have enough experience with 802.11ac clients under large-scale 802.11ac WLANs.

 

But it's worth discussing one of the key questions, how far apart to put the access points.

 

Our best advice for now is that the network design guidelines for 802.11n APs should be good for 802.11ac.  We don't expect effective cell radius to grow with 802.11ac, and indeed to get the highest rates - the new 256QAM rates - a pretty strong signal is needed, which means short distances from the access point.  There's a school of thought that says for highest network capacity the cells should get smaller with 802.11ac.

 

Of course, unless you are floating an 802.11ac overlay over an 802.11n WLAN, most of the clients will be running at 802.11n rates, at least for the next year or two.

 

We think replacing existing 802.11n access points with 802.11ac and laying out new 802.11ac WLANs with design rules taken from 802.11n are perfectly good approaches for now.

 

Peter T (Antar on Airheads)

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