How do we understand the output of "show datapath user table" on the Controller?

Aruba Employee

Environment Information  :  

 

Any Aruba Controller
Any Access Point
Any Aruba OS 

 

 

Symptoms  :  Useful command for troubleshooting any Layer 3 client or controller connectivity issues, due to a loop for example 

Cause  :  The Controller datapath (DP) has its own memory and info (table) for different handling of user traffic. 

 

Resolution  :  The output can sometimes help resolve issues with multiple entries for the same client MAC address (IP spoofing), or to verify the number of sessions per client IP address.  

   

 

 

Answer  :  The datapath (DP) has its own memory and info (table) for different handling of user traffic.  The datapath user table describe the user entries (MAC and IP) that is known to the Controller's Datapath.  The output can sometimes be good to check if there are multiple entries for the same client MAC address (IP spoofing), or to verify the number of sessions per client IP address.  The DP user table also tells you about the ACL number, location (ap-group) as well as number of TCP/UDP session associated with each IP address.  We may also see a 0.0.0.0 for the user-mac sometimes, which indicates an L2 entry, unless 0.0.0.0 is used as a test L3 interface on the Controller (say VRRP).  The datapath user table should always be the same as "show user-table verbose" plus the Controller's own entry for each L3 interface like IP interface and VRRP IPs.  Following is a sample output:

 

rtaImage 1.jpg

 

L3 Interfaces on the Controller:

 

rtaImage 2.jpg

 

rtaImage 3.jpg

 

rtaImage 4.jpg

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Last update:
‎07-10-2014 05:56 PM
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Suggestion for article and/or documentation improvement:

 

The manual does not go into much detail about the meaning of many of the flags values.  For example, what exactly does the "L2 Enforce" (E) mean?  Does that mean enforce-dhcp is active on that IP, or that it has some other sort of L2 ACL?  Or that an enforce-dhcp violation occured and packets were dropped thereby?  Or does it have nothing entirely to do with dhcp-enforce?  Information like this would be very helpful for an article of this title.

 

 

 

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