What are the various ARM features that are available in Aruba Central dashboard?

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Question What are the various ARM features that are available in Aruba Central dashboard?
Environment This article applies to all the IAPs running Instant OS version 6.2.1.0-3.3.0.0 or higher and managed by Aruba Central.

 

ARM on Aruba Central has two broad categories:

  1. Client Control
  2. Access Point Control

Under Client Control, you can configure the following features:

  1. Band Steering Mode: Band steering mode determines the band to which a client connects. Band Steering mode can configured to be:
  1. Prefer 5GHz: Select this option to use band steering in 5 GHz mode. On selecting this, the IAP steers the client to 5 GHz band (if the client is 5 GHz capable), but allows the client connection on the 2.4 GHz band if the client persistently attempts for 2.4 GHz association.

      b.  Force 5GHz: Select this option to enforce 5 GHz band steering mode on the IAPs.

      c. Balance Bands: Select this option if you want the IAP to try to balance the clients across the two radios to best utilize the available 2.4 GHz bandwidth. This feature takes into account that the 5 GHz band has more channels than the 2.4 GHz band, and that the 5 GHz channels operate in 40MHz while the 2.5 GHz band operates in 20MHz.

      d. Disabled: Select this option if you want to allow the clients to select the band to use.

     2.  Airtime Fairness: Airtime Fairness is needed to provide every client with an equal opportunity to utilize the network bandwidth irrespective of client type, capability, or operating system.

      Following are the three Airtime fairness modes:

  1. Default-access: Airtime Fairness is basically disabled, and clients are entertained based on the requests they make.
  2. Fair-access: Each client gets the same airtime, regardless of client capability and capacity. This option is useful in environments like a training facility or exam hall, where a mix of 802.11a/g, 802.11g, and 802.11n clients need equal to network resources, regardless of their capabilities.
  3. Preferred-access: High-throughput (802.11a/n) clients do not get penalized because of slower 802.11g or 802.11b client transmissions that take more air time due to lower transmit rates. The 802.11a clients get more airtime than 802.11g clients which in turn get more airtime than 802.11b. The ratio is 16:4:1.


     3. Spectrum Load Balancing: Spectrum Load Balancing (SLB) ensures that the clients are assigned to less loaded channels. When enabled, the Virtual Controller compares whether an AP has more clients than its neighboring APs on other channels. When the client load for an AP reaches or exceeds the threshold specified for SLB threshold, load balancing is enabled on the AP.

     4. SLB Calculating Interval: This feature determines how often SLB must be calculated. Default value is 30 seconds. You can specify a value within the range of 10-600.
 

     5. SLB Neighbor Matching %: The value specified for SLB neighbor matching % indicates the percentage for comparing client density of AP neighbors to determine the client load on a specific AP channel.
You can  specify a percentage value within the range of 20-100. The default value is 75%.
 
     6. SLB Threshold: The value specified for SLB threshold indicates the number of clients on a channel. When the client load for an AP reaches or exceeds the specified threshold, load balancing is enabled on the AP. You can specify a value within range of 1-20. The default value is 2.

 
Under Access Point Control, you can configure the following features:

     1. Customize Valid Channel: Use this option to customize the list of channels that are considered valid for data transmission within the regulatory domain.

     2. Min Transmit power:  Use this option to configure the minimum threshold for transmit power below which the AP cannot transmit

     3. Max Transmit Power: Use this option to configure the maximum threshold for transmit power above which the AP cannot transmit.

     4. Client Aware: This feature in ARM prevents an AP to switch channels when there is an active client associated to it. When this feature is enabled, an AP will switch channel only under extreme circumstances like detecting radar or excessive noise/interference on current channel.

     5. Scanning: This feature enables the IAP to scan all the 802.11 channels periodically and reports details like Rogue, interference, intrusion detection etc.

     6. Wide Channel Bands: Select a band to place APs in 40MHz (wide band) channels. The Wide channel band allows administrators to configure 40 MHz channels in the 2.4 GHz and 5.0 GHz bands. 40 MHz channels are two 20 MHz adjacent channels that are bonded together. They effectively doubles the frequency bandwidth available for data transmission. For high performance, you can select 5.0 GHz. If the AP density is low, select the 2.4GHz band.

Version history
Revision #:
1 of 1
Last update:
‎07-10-2014 12:47 PM
 
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