Mobility Hero Tutorials

Increase diskspace on Airwave running on VMware - Jan 2014

Super Contributor II

Tutorial created by  

This tutorial will explain how to physically add a new drive your VMWare server and increase the diskspace on Airwave to utilize this new drive.

 

Attached is a document on how to accomplish this task.

 

EDIT: As requested (finally had time), here is the article posted.

 

1         Purpose of document

To be able to extend the hard drive space of an Airwave server deployed on a Virtual Machine using VMWare.

2         How to add a new SATA drive to an VMWare ESXi Server

  • Insert new drive into spare slot on the server, connect all cables required
  • Boot Airwave server
  • Log into your vSphere application.
  • Navigate to the Configuration section as per below

1.png

 

Highlight the desired datastore where AMP is installed on.

 

Right-click and select ‘properties’

2.png

 

Click on the ‘Increase’ button and it will discover your new drive, highlight it and click on ‘next’

 

3.png

 

Select Maximum available space or if desired custom space setting. Click on ‘next’

4.png

 

Then click on Finish

 

5.png

 

Once you’ve clicked on finish, you will now see both disks and your total capacity changed.

 

6.png

You can click on close.

 

You have now added the new sata drive to your existing datastore.

 

3         Modification to the Airwave VM

 

Next step is to have Airwave recognize this new hard drive.

 

First step is to increase the amount of Hard Drive space the VM will be using

Go into Edit settings of your VM and click on the hard disk 

 

7.png

 

Make it whatever size you want (depends on the datastore) and click ok,

 

Now let’s make AMP recognize the new HD Space.

 

There are multiple ways to accomplish this but I found this to be the easiest.

 

Download a LIVE CD version of Ubuntu Desktop and save the ISO

 

Select Ubuntu as the ISO for the CDROM Drive

 

8.png

 

 

9.png

 

Reboot AMP and press F2 when prompted to go into the boot screen, choose CDROM as the 1st boot device.

 

10.png

 

 

Save and reboot

 

Then Ubuntu begins to load

Choose language of your choice

 

11.png

 

Select ‘Try Ubuntu without installing’

 

12.png

 

It begins to load:

13.png

 

Once it loads, go into the GPARTED program.

 

14.png

 

You will now see an unallocated section of HD Space

 

15.png

 

Right-Click on it and create new partition and leave the file system to be unformatted.

 

16.png

 

 

Click Apply.

 

You should see something like this /dev/sda3

 

17.png

 

Next step is to add the LVM flag to the new drive.

Right-click and click on Manage Flags

18.png

 

Select the ‘lvm’ flag

 

19.png

 

Select LVM and click on close.

 

At this time, you can shutdown Ubuntu and boot back into AMP (don’t forget to remove the ISO from the CDROM).

 

4         Configuring CentOS to recognize the new drive

 

Once AMP has booted up, log in via SSH

 

Next step is to make sure you see the new drive added

 

# Confirm /dev/sda3 exists or if it gets another name using ‘fdisk –l’

 

[root@aw-1 mercury]# fdisk -l

 

Disk /dev/sda: 85.9 GB, 85899345920 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 10443 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

Disk identifier: 0x0009f7c3

 

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System

/dev/sda1   *           1          13      102400   83  Linux

Partition 1 does not end on cylinder boundary.

/dev/sda2              13        5222    41839616   8e  Linux LVM

/dev/sda3            5222       10444    41943040   8e  Linux LVM

 

Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol01: 4294 MB, 4294967296 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 522 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

Disk identifier: 0x00000000

 

 

Disk /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00: 81.4 GB, 81436606464 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 9900 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes

Disk identifier: 0x00000000

 

[root@aw-1 mercury]#

 

# SDA3 is our new drive

 

Now we create the physical volume using the command ‘pvcreate /dev/sda3’

 

# Create the one physical volume

[root@aw-1 mercury]# pvcreate /dev/sda3

  Writing physical volume data to disk "/dev/sda3"

  Physical volume "/dev/sda3" successfully created

 

We then check the configuration of the volume group using ‘vgdisplay’

 

# Check current configuration of the volume group is 1 physical volume

[root@aw-1 mercury]# vgdisplay

  --- Volume group ---

  VG Name               VolGroup00

  System ID

  Format                lvm2

  Metadata Areas        1

  Metadata Sequence No  3

  VG Access             read/write

  VG Status             resizable

  MAX LV                0

  Cur LV                2

  Open LV               2

  Max PV                0

  Cur PV                1

  Act PV                1   #Actual Physical Volumes = 1

  VG Size               39.88 GiB

  PE Size               32.00 MiB

  Total PE              1276

  Alloc PE / Size       1276 / 39.88 GiB

  Free  PE / Size       0 / 0

  VG UUID               56Leag-jwVA-RJOD-0WOm-fltC-2fcI-RAKqB1

 

Add new SDA3 to the LVM Volume group using ‘vgextend VolGroup00 /dev/sda3’

 

# 2. Add it to the volume group

[root@aw-1 mercury]# vgextend VolGroup00 /dev/sda3

  Volume group "VolGroup00" successfully extended

 

Validate volume group

# Validate size of the volume group

[root@aw-1 mercury]# vgdisplay

  --- Volume group ---

  VG Name               VolGroup00

  System ID

  Format                lvm2

  Metadata Areas        2

  Metadata Sequence No  4

  VG Access             read/write

  VG Status             resizable

  MAX LV                0

  Cur LV                2

  Open LV               2

  Max PV                0

  Cur PV                2

  Act PV                2

  VG Size               79.84 GiB

  PE Size               32.00 MiB

  Total PE              2555

  Alloc PE / Size       1276 / 39.88 GiB

  Free  PE / Size       1279 / 39.97 GiB

  VG UUID               56Leag-jwVA-RJOD-0WOm-fltC-2fcI-RAKqB1

 

Act PV is now 2 and VG size is doubled

 

Now let’s resize the volume.

This depends on the ‘FREE PE / Size’. You must use the value contained there.

In this case 1279 as indicated above.

 

Let’s resize the space using the command below

 

# Resize the space 

 

[root@aw-1 mercury]# lvextend --resizefs --extents +1279 /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00

  Extending logical volume LogVol00 to 75.84 GiB

  Logical volume LogVol00 successfully resized

resize2fs 1.41.12 (17-May-2010)

Filesystem at /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 is mounted on /; on-line resizing required

old desc_blocks = 3, new_desc_blocks = 5

Performing an on-line resize of /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 to 19881984 (4k) blocks.

The filesystem on /dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00 is now 19881984 blocks long.

 

And confirm Free PE / Size is now 0

 

# Confirm the LVM volume group has been extended with the

# new harddrive

[root@aw-1 mercury]# vgdisplay

  --- Volume group ---

  VG Name               VolGroup00

  System ID

  Format                lvm2

  Metadata Areas        2

  Metadata Sequence No  5

  VG Access             read/write

  VG Status             resizable

  MAX LV                0

  Cur LV                2

  Open LV               2

  Max PV                0

  Cur PV                2

  Act PV                2

  VG Size               79.84 GiB

  PE Size               32.00 MiB

  Total PE              2555

  Alloc PE / Size       2555 / 79.84 GiB

  Free  PE / Size       0 / 0

  VG UUID               56Leag-jwVA-RJOD-0WOm-fltC-2fcI-RAKqB1

 

[root@aw-1 mercury]# df -h

Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on

/dev/mapper/VolGroup00-LogVol00

                       75G  4.8G   67G   7% /

tmpfs                 3.9G     0  3.9G   0% /dev/shm

/dev/sda1              97M   36M   57M  39% /boot

 

 

You have now successfully resized AMP to use the extra HD space

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Last update:
‎02-25-2014 03:41 PM
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