Monitoring, Management & Location Tracking

How to find what ports are allowed on the remote HOST from Airwave CLI

Aruba Employee

Answer :

 

 

nmap is a network mapper utility used to check the availability of hosts and their services. Using nmap, you can check whether a specific TCP/UDP port of a remote host is open or not.

 

To ping a TCP port of a remote host using nmap from airwave CLI:

# nmap -p 443 -sT <www.example.com>

where "-p" to specifiy a port number and "-sT"  is to scan TCP, similarly for UDP ports,  we could do "-sU", which will scan UDP:

# nmap -p 80 -sU <www.example.com>


Below are the example outputs:

For TCP:

# nmap -p 443 -sT <www.example.com>

 

Starting Nmap 5.21 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2014-07-21 15:20 EST
Nmap scan report for  <www.example.com>
Host is up (0.17s latency).
PORT    STATE    SERVICE
443/tcp filtered https

For UDP:

nmap -p 514 -sU <www.example.com>

 

Starting Nmap 5.21 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2014-07-21 15:30 EST
Nmap scan report for  <www.example.com>
Host is up (0.18s latency).
PORT    STATE         SERVICE
514/udp open|filtered syslog

Explanation of the output:

When we do the scan, the port will mostly be either open, filtered, closed, or unfiltered.

Open : means that an application on the target machine is listening for connections/packets on that port. 

Filtered:  means that a firewall, filter, or other network obstacle is blocking the port so that Nmap cannot tell whether it is open or closed. 

Closed:  ports have no application listening on them, though they could open up at any time.

Unfiltered: Ports are classified as unfiltered, when they are responsive to Nmap's probes, but Nmap cannot determine whether they are open or
closed.

Open|Filtered and Closed|Filtered: Nmap reports this state of combinations. when it cannot determine which of the two states describe a port.

 

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‎09-22-2014 04:49 AM
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