Monitoring, Management & Location Tracking

Resizing CentOS LVM inside VM

This is more or less just a mash up of How to resize a VMWARE virtual disk and Resize LVM -Centos.

*WARNING* THIS CAN RESULT IN FILE SYSTEM CORRUPTION IF DONE IMPROPERLY. Storing the most recent AirWave backup OFF-SERVER is *STRONGLY* recommended.

First just check the partition table of the virtual disk in the VM

# fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 68.7 GB, 68719476736 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 10443 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 13 104391 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 14 8354 66999082+ 8e Linux LVM

Now, shutdown the guest in preparation to resize the virtual disk

# shutdown

Resize the guest OS partition using VSphere Client (ESXi) or other VMtool (See VMWare support)

Boot the AirWave VM guest back up, and add a new partition with the free space of the virtual disk. Make sure to use partition id 8e for Linux LVM.

# fdisk /dev/sda
# n {new partition}
# p {primary partition}
# 3 {select partition number, by default 3 is the next available}

# t {select partition id we just made (3)}
# 8e {Linux LVM partition}
# p {print. the new device should be described as Linux LVM}
# w {write to memory}

You will need to reboot if fdisk updated kernel tables, just follow the recommendation message that will show up.

# reboot

You can check the partition table after the reboot if you like, make sure it looks like what you expect

fdisk -l /dev/sda

Disk /dev/sda: 85.8 GB, 85899345920 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 10443 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
/dev/sda1 * 1 13 104391 83 Linux
/dev/sda2 14 8354 66999082+ 8e Linux LVM
/dev/sda3 8355 10443 16779892+ 8e Linux LVM
Now, create a new physical volume from the new partition

# pvcreate /dev/sda3

Then extend the existing volume group, you may want to use vgdisplay to list and identify the volume groups you have.

# vgextend VolGroup00 /dev/sda3

Now, extend the logical volume, again, use lvdisplay to list and identify the logical volumes you have.

# lvextend -L<TOTAL_VOLUME_DESIRED_SIZE>G /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00 /dev/sda3
And finally, resize the filesystem in the logical volume

# resize2fs /dev/VolGroup00/LogVol00

Done.

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Last update:
‎06-25-2014 02:06 PM
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