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MVP
Posts: 2,992
Registered: ‎10-25-2011

Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

I was wondering if there was any documentation, not technical one that could explain clients withtout too much understanding about WIFI understand why suddenly you need a way more APS(for 5ghz coverage and also that the requiremnts are just not the same)

 

I mean always when im doing a Site survey the numbers of APS goes up and the client always ask me why do i need soo many APS? i have 5 APS and now i need 10APS it makes not sense to me!

And then i need to go and explain him why.  Sometimes another partner from other vendors just replace them the same number of APS and thats it(Chearper but that model just doesnt work as expected) and then the client get the idea that wifi is not reliable and wifi its slow, wifi is bad.  Etc...

 

A documentation that could explain this in a non too much technical way that anyone can understand would be REALLY helpful... i mean last few months i have been going to the same process, and all of them asking me the same, and that it make no sense to them.  

 

I know its on the VRD but its maybe too techy on the VRD? 

So far it has help me sometimes sending the information on that design VRD.   But sometimes some clients does not find that enough and they still doubt in what you are trying to explain them.

 

Anyways someone got any documment like im trying to find? or Aruba guys can you do one of those? becasue that would be really useful...

 

Cheers

Carlos 

----------------------------------------------------
Product Manager - Aruba Networks
Alternetworks Corp
Guru Elite
Posts: 21,023
Registered: ‎03-29-2007

Re: Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

The simple answer is that back when the network was first deployed it was about coverage. Now it is about capacity.


Colin Joseph
Aruba Customer Engineering

Looking for an Answer? Search the Community Knowledge Base Here: Community Knowledge Base

Guru Elite
Posts: 21,023
Registered: ‎03-29-2007

Re: Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

btw,

 

The 802.11ac migration guide is here:  http://www.arubanetworks.com/pdf/technology/MG_80211ac.pdf

 



Colin Joseph
Aruba Customer Engineering

Looking for an Answer? Search the Community Knowledge Base Here: Community Knowledge Base

MVP
Posts: 2,992
Registered: ‎10-25-2011

Re: Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

Thanks for the document Colin, i do already got it on my library of Aruba Docs.   Im looking for a document for the end client.

I do explain them that its about capacity now,  i try to explain them that the needs were just different 8 years ago, now you got more devices you didnt have before, even if they dont want to admit it, because some of them just reply me, but we are using the same number of devices(which is not true). 

 

Im just thinking on doing a document myselft. but i need to explain it in a really really easy way that anyone can understand... but i was still wondering that maybe there was one document out there that someone had... 

Also if aruba could do it as well would be nice, you have no idea how many times i have use the VRD to back up what im saying when someone dont want to listen, or dont want to bealive you.    I hope you guys never stop doing them. 

 

Cheers

Carlos

----------------------------------------------------
Product Manager - Aruba Networks
Alternetworks Corp
Guru Elite
Posts: 8,458
Registered: ‎09-08-2010

Re: Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

CWNP may be a good resource.



Also, sometimes in those scenarios having an Aruba SE there to back you up
can be helpful.

Tim Cappalli | Aruba Security TME
@timcappalli | timcappalli.me | ACMX #367 / ACCX #480
Frequent Contributor I
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎07-16-2014

Re: Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

In non-technical terms?  I like telephone analogies.  Back in the a/b/g days, you could get away with deploying a network like the early telephone system, where a house, or even a block of houses, could all share a party line.  Nowadays everyone expects the system to have enough capacity to handle a much greater load of phone calls, and we deal with it by deploying cell phones - lots more lines, each one designed to handle one client instead of a whole house or more worth of clients.

Guru Elite
Posts: 21,023
Registered: ‎03-29-2007

Re: Documentation about migration from 802.11g to 802.11n or 802.11ac

The #genmobile document here:  http://www.arubanetworks.com/pdf/solutions/GenMobile_Report.pdf describes how things were and how they are now.  It is not very technical and it compares the number of connected devices from before compared  to the devices today.  See if that helps explain.



Colin Joseph
Aruba Customer Engineering

Looking for an Answer? Search the Community Knowledge Base Here: Community Knowledge Base

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