Wireless Access

Reply
MVP
Posts: 371
Registered: ‎01-14-2010

LACP configuration between a 3600 and a Juniper MX80

All,

 

This is a recent blog post that I wanted to share with the community.

 

-Mike

 

http://networkarch.blogspot.com/2012/03/lag-configuration-between-aruba.html

 

Last week I setup a LAG connection between an Aruba 3600 controller and a Juniper MX80. This LAG was made up of two copper SFP connections from the MX80 to the copper Ethernet ports on an Aruba 3600.*

First, let's configure the Aruba 3600. Previously, I had the following single interface configuration:

interface gigabitethernet  1/0

        trusted
        trusted vlan 1-4094
        switchport mode trunk
        switchport access vlan 714
        switchport trunk allowed vlan 714-719
        no spanning-tree
!


It is pretty straight forward to create a LAG in Aruba OS. First, copy the entirety of your previous config and paste it under a new "port-channel 0" interface. Here's the new configuration:

interface port-channel 0
        trusted
        trusted vlan 1-4094
        switchport mode trunk
        switchport access vlan 714
        switchport trunk allowed vlan 714-719
        no spanning-tree
!


Next, remove the previous configuration the 1/0 interface. We will then assign two specific ports to the port channel group. Here's that configuration:

interface gigabitethernet  1/0
        description "GE1/0"
        trusted
        trusted vlan 1-4094
        lacp timeout short
        lacp group 0 mode passive
!

interface gigabitethernet  1/1
        description "GE1/1"
        trusted
        trusted vlan 1-4094
        lacp timeout short
        lacp group 0 mode passive
!


Let's take a look at the Juniper MX80 configuration. First, the chassis needs to be informed that aggregated Ethernet bundles will be present. Here's the command to make that possible:

mike@test1-80# show chassis aggregated-devices 
ethernet {
    device-count 128;
}

If I had a nickel for every time I've forgot that...

Next, we will do the same general procedure that we performed above: copy the initial interface to a new aggregated Ethernet interface, "ae2" in my example. For example:

copy interfaces ge-1/1/0 to ae2

The following must be added to ae2 to properly configure LACP:

mike@test1-80# show interfaces ae2 aggregated-ether-options                  
minimum-links 1;
link-speed 1g;
lacp {
    active;
    periodic fast;
}

Now let's add a couple of interfaces to the ae2 aggregated Ethernet bundle:

mike@test1-80# show interfaces ge-1/1/0 
gigether-options {
    802.3ad ae2;
}
mike@test1# show interfaces ge-1/1/1    
gigether-options {
    802.3ad ae2;
}

Finally, commit these changes and we'll verify connectivity.

Run the following command to verify initial LAG connectivity:

mike@test1-80> show lacp interfaces ae2 
Aggregated interface: ae2
    LACP state:       Role   Exp   Def  Dist  Col  Syn  Aggr  Timeout  Activity
      ge-1/1/0       Actor    No    No   Yes  Yes  Yes   Yes     Fast    Active
      ge-1/1/0     Partner    No    No   Yes  Yes  Yes   Yes     Fast   Passive
      ge-1/1/1       Actor    No    No   Yes  Yes  Yes   Yes     Fast    Active
      ge-1/1/1     Partner    No    No   Yes  Yes  Yes   Yes     Fast   Passive
    LACP protocol:        Receive State  Transmit State          Mux State 
      ge-1/1/0                  Current   Fast periodic Collecting distributing
      ge-1/1/1                  Current   Fast periodic Collecting distributing
The LAG is configured properly when the "Mux State" is "Collecting Distributing." There's an issue with your configuration if you receive a "Detached" Mux State. Here's a configuration with a downed interface:
mike@test1-80# run show lacp interfaces ae2 
Aggregated interface: ae2
    LACP state:       Role   Exp   Def  Dist  Col  Syn  Aggr  Timeout  Activity
      ge-1/1/0       Actor    No    No   Yes  Yes  Yes   Yes     Fast    Active
      ge-1/1/0     Partner    No    No   Yes  Yes  Yes   Yes     Fast   Passive
      ge-1/1/1       Actor    No   Yes    No   No   No   Yes     Fast    Active
      ge-1/1/1     Partner    No   Yes    No   No   No   Yes     Fast   Passive
    LACP protocol:        Receive State  Transmit State          Mux State 
      ge-1/1/0                  Current   Fast periodic Collecting distributing
      ge-1/1/1            Port disabled     No periodic           Detached 

Let's take a look at some deeper statistics from this LAG:

mike@test1-80# run show interfaces ae2.32767 extensive | find "LACP info" 
    LACP info:        Role     System             System      Port    Port  Port 
                             priority          identifier  priority  number   key 
      ge-1/1/0.32767    Actor      127 5c:5e:ab:d1:42:c0       127       5     3
      ge-1/1/0.32767  Partner    32768 00:0b:86:61:61:a4       255       1     1
      ge-1/1/1.32767    Actor      127 5c:5e:ab:d1:42:c0       127       6     3
      ge-1/1/1.32767  Partner    32768 00:0b:86:61:61:a4       255       2     1
    LACP Statistics:       LACP Rx     LACP Tx   Unknown Rx   Illegal Rx 
      ge-1/1/0.32767        363201      380836            0            0
      ge-1/1/1.32767        363194      380836            0            0
    Marker Statistics:   Marker Rx     Resp Tx   Unknown Rx   Illegal Rx
      ge-1/1/0.32767             0           0            0            0
      ge-1/1/1.32767             0           0            0            0
    Protocol multiservice, MTU: Unlimited, Generation: 388, Route table: 0
      Flags: None
      Policer: Input: __default_arp_policer__

The above shows the following:

MX80 System identifier: 5c:5e:ab:d1:42:c0
Partner / Aruba 3600 System identifier: 00:0b:86:61:61:a4

Now, let's verify the LAG configuration on the Aruba controller and verify system identifiers.

(Test-Local.wlu.edu) #show lacp 0 neighbor 
Flags: S - Device is requesting slow LACPDUs
       F - Device is requesting fast LACPDUs
       A - Device is in Active mode P - Device is in Passive mode
LACP Neighbor Table
-------------------
Port    Flags  Pri  OperKey  State  Num  Dev Id
----    -----  ---  -------  -----  ---  ------
GE 1/0  FA     127  0x3      0x3f   0x5  5C:5E:AB:D1:42:C0
GE 1/1  FA     127  0x3      0x3f   0x6  5C:5E:AB:D1:42:C0

The above shows the LAG partner's "Dev Id" which matches the system identifier from the MX80.

(Test-Local.wlu.edu) #show lacp sys-id 
32768,00:0B:86:61:61:A4
 
The MAC address after the comma corresponds to the system identifier reported on the MX80.

(Test-Local.wlu.edu) #show lacp 0 internal 
Flags: S - Device is requesting slow LACPDUs
       F - Device is requesting fast LACPDUs
       A - Device is in Active mode P - Device is in Passive mode
LACP Internal Table
-------------------
Port    Flags  Pri  AdminKey  OperKey  State  Num  Status
----    -----  ---  --------  -------  -----  ---  ------
GE 1/0  FP     255  0x1       0x1      0x3e   0x1  up
GE 1/1  FP     255  0x1       0x1      0x3e   0x2  up
The above "Status" shows that LACP is up on both of the interfaces. Congrats, you've setup an aggregated Ethernet / port channel between an Aruba 3600 controller and Juniper MX80!

---

* There's a known bug in ArubaOS below 6.1.2.8 where the port statistics will increment unexpectedly if you use fiber SFP connections. The commands to verify this in your configuration is:

show port link-event

The output will look like the following:

Slot/Port   UP     DOWN              Slot/Port   UP     DOWN
---------   --     ----              ---------   --     ----
  1 /  0    3      2                   1 /  1    3      2   
  1 /  2    0      0                   1 /  3    0      0   

You would notice the link events incrementing with fiber SFPs.
Search Airheads
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: