Wireless Access

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New Contributor
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎02-28-2012

Securing a cloud database

Hi all, hope I'm in the right forum. I'd like to ask regarding securing my information: I have a small home-based business, and I rely heavily on this cloud database, as it contains customer lists and other sensitive information. I was wondering whether the fact that I use a wireless connection to upload and retrieve information to it poses special security issues, and if so, what can be done about it. Mostly, I'm not sure who I should turn to to verify the security of information: the ISP or the cloud service.

 

Any help would be most welcomed. Thanks in advance!

Contributor I
Posts: 30
Registered: ‎01-04-2012

Re: Securing a cloud database

If you think about it this way, nothing is really completely 'secure' unless it is physically unaccessible by the general public.  If a hacker wants to gain access to something, if they are determined enough, they will.  IT Security is mostly making that attempt as difficult as possible so as in the process it will discourage them, and they will stop.  

 

Any wireless traffic can be easily sniffed and decoded with the proper programs, but like I said, making that traffic encrypted, say using WPA2-AES; will help to make that process difficult enough as to hopefully discourage someone from continuing to attempt a hack.  

 

The more security concious you are as an individual the harder it is for someone to gain access to your information. 

 

Secure passwords, encrypted traffic, anti-virus and firewall programs, all these things help.  If you decide to connect through an unecrypted website, or use an uncrypted wi-fi connection, chances are that you will inevitably have someone take a peak at your information.  

 

To get to my point, most of the 'security' can be done on your side to keep yourself safe.  Make sure that you connect to your cloud database, through a secure-encrypted tunnel, preferably using SSL, and other L2 capabilities.  Make sure your connecting through a minimum of a WPA2-AES connection (current standard afaik); and if you really want to deter people, use atleast a 10 character, alpha-numeric-symbol password, and change it every 30 days; for your WPA2-AES password. Do not have it written down, make it something easily remembered; easy way to do this is take a word, change it around so that you replace some of the letters with upper case/symbols. 

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