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Understanding Switch Ports

Hi 

 

Newbie here, trying to understand our aruba switches, when putty in and look at the Ports we have the following below.  It is a 24 port switch, why do we have 1A - 1/A3 is this to do with the optical fiber ports and why do we have 2/1 -2/24 and 3/1 - 3/24 any information would be grealty apprecaited. forgive my dumb question i am use to only seeing ports 1 - 24 on a 24 port switch.

 

1/1 - 1/24

1/A1 - 1/A3 

2/1 - 2/24

2/A1 - 2/A4

3/1 - 3/24

3/A1 - 3/A4

 

 

 

Occasional Contributor I

Re: Understanding Switch Ports

What is the switch type? 

If it is 2930F/2930M or 3810M is can by in stack mode ? in that case this type of numbers is normal.

 

switch to stand-alone:

conf t

stacking disable

 

switch wil reboot en operate in normal mode

New Contributor

Re: Understanding Switch Ports

Hi tdlooff

 

Its a 3810 and it is stacked with another 2 x 3810 switches, so am i correct to say that when you dial in to one swich using putty you are see the other two switches 2/1 - 2/24 3/1 -3/24 and are the 1A - 3A ports the optical fiber ports?

 

thanks for responding  

Occasional Contributor I

Re: Understanding Switch Ports

Hi jbcom41,

 

Yes that correct.

1/1-1/48 --> first member ports

2/1-2/48 --> second member ports

1/1-1/48 --> third member ports

 

Extra modules can use the A/B numbering.

If you use extra modules for the gbics it shoud be 1/a1, 2/a2 and so on ...

 

I use the 3810M with 16 SFP+ ports, here is my info:

(only 4 ports connected this time)

 

SW-01# sho interfaces brief

Status and Counters - Port Status

| Intrusion MDI Flow Bcast
Port Type | Alert Enabled Status Mode Mode Ctrl Limit
------------ ---------- + --------- ------- ------ ---------- ---- ---- -----
1/1 SFP+DA1 | No Yes Up 10GigFD NA off 0
1/2 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/3 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/4 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/5 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/6 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/7 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/8 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/9 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/10 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/11 SFP+DA1 | No Yes Up 10GigFD NA off 0
1/12 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/13 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/14 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/15 | No Yes Down . off 0
1/16 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/1 SFP+DA1 | No Yes Up 10GigFD NA off 0
2/2 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/3 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/4 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/5 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/6 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/7 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/8 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/9 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/10 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/11 SFP+DA1 | No Yes Up 10GigFD NA off 0
2/12 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/13 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/14 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/15 | No Yes Down . off 0
2/16 | No Yes Down . off 0

 

Regular Contributor I

Re: Understanding Switch Ports

When switches are stacked, either with dedicated stacking modules or using VSF (2930F) there is only one logical device. When you connect via SSH you're communicating with the Commander. The same applies if you use a console cable - only one management instance is available. Hence that management instance needs to know about all the ports on the switch.

 

We've been working this way for some time with HPE 5130s and now 2930F switches. Putting them in a large stack makes for fewer devices to manage.

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